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Nov 202020 Gossip
 

Whether you’re an assistant, a stylist or a manager, it’s easy to pick up bad habits over the years. But identifying them and breaking them is easier than you think, according to Akin Konizi, international creative director for HOB Academy. But, as 2020 gives us all a bit of time to think and reset, it’s the perfect opportunity to break bad habits – and start new ones !

Akin-Konizi

“Not all habits are bad, but those that are tend to stem from boredom or stress,” AKIN KONIZI says. “Bad habits may seem harmless, but they can affect the way you work, the quality of your work and the respect you get from clients and your team. Identifying your BAD HABITS is the first step, and BREAKING them isn’t as hard as you think.

2020 has been a year of REFLECTION and it’s the perfect chance to break those habits and replace them with ones that will make you a BETTER HAIRDRESSER.”

Five bad habits hairdressers can break, according to Akin Konizi

  • 1 Habit: Boredom
    Replace with: vigour. Being bored is the biggest habit to break. Think about why you are bored – it’s often because what you do has become repetitive. Try to work ‘consciously’ rather than just going through the motions.
  • 2 Habit: Shunning responsibility
    Replace with: culpability. We all need to be responsible for what we do, from the decisions we make to the hairstyles we create. Take responsibility for what you are creating and that will encourage your development.
  • 3 Habit: Staffroom breaks
    Replace with: getting out there. Sitting in the staffroom on your phone is such a waste of time, scrolling through gossip sites and general rubbish on social media. Because of social distancing it can be hard to be out on the floor, but use your free time with your team, watching what they are doing, have conversations with clients and team members.
  • 4 Habit: lack of communication
    Replace with: share your expertise. Never ask your client “what are we doing today?” You’re the expert, inspire your clients! They are visiting you for the benefit of your expertise, your knowledge and your advice. Ask open questions about how they feel about their hair, make recommendations and explain why you’ve made those recommendations, ultimately reaching an agreement between you both.
  • 5 Habit: using clippers
    Replace with: scissors. Don’t be tempted to use the clippers just because they’re quick and easy. Keep prioritising your scissor-over-comb skills; it develops your scissor action and opens up a world of cutting opportunities.
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Dec 112019 Gossip
 

HOB Salons has been named as Best Salon Group at the Fellowship for British Hairdressing’s Luncheon & Award 2019, beating the best of business in the hairdressing industry.

Directors Akin Konizi, Clive Collins and Paul Simbler collected the award in front of their peers at a glittering lunch at the Intercontinental Hotel in London’s Park Lane. HOB Academy head of education, Jake Unger, also picked up the award for Snapshot Image of the Year with a beautiful copper style.

jake unger
Jake Unger Look

HOB Salons, which has some 25 salons and employs more than 480 team members, celebrated its 35th anniversary last year and adds these trophies to their collection of 60 other creative, business and international awards.

Akin said: “We are delighted to win the Salon Group award, which is for everyone that works for HOB Salons. We have some amazing people within the company and we are very proud they have been recognised for the work they do.”

4 (80%) 1 vote[s]
Dec 022019 Gossip
 

“Wearable geometry was my goal with these haircuts” Akin Konizi,
international creative director, HOB Academy

LOOK 1

1 – Divide the back from the front at the back of the ear, then split the back in half from the top to the nape. Take sections parallel to your baseline.
Once you’re happy with the outline shape, begin to work up one side first with even tension and cutting on the skin. Repeat on opposite side.
2 – Once both sides are complete, start to create the length on the side area. Taking a horizontal section continue the shape through the sides,
allowing for the ear area – and once again using even tension to create a small amount of graduation, enabling the hair to have a bevel. Continue up to the parting and then repeat on the opposite side.
3 – The most focal point of this haircut is the fringe. Usually a fringe area would be from the parting and then to either recession area, forming a triangle shaped section. For this particular haircut the fringe area was extended towards the ear area to give a twist on a classic bob shape.
Once sectioned off, take sections parallel to the hairline and cut the desired shape. Continue with even tension to complete the shape.
4 – Blow-dry with a Denman brush, then a round brush, and finish with styling irons.

LOOK 2

1 – Section the length from just under the occipital bone in a curved horseshoe-shaped section. It’s best to think of this haircut as a short hair with longer length around the perimeter shape.
2 – Work with a classic round layer to allow the hair to hug the head shape. I would advise to keep the top slightly square to ensure you do not create
a corner which would result in added weight on top.
Choose the optimal length carefully to allow for texturizing afterwards. Also, slightly lift towards the bottom of the sides to keep a little more weight at the bottom to later create the stronger outline.
3 – Take horizontal sections on the side, and create a geometric outline whilst still keeping an element of softness over the ears.
4 – Texturize throughout and cut the fringe to the desired length.

Haircut by Akin Konizi, international creative director, HOB Academy, London
Colour: Warren Boodaghian, head of technical, HOB Academy

5 (100%) 1 vote[s]
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